Affordable and clean energy

Students are divided into three groups to work on different scenarios and reveal their implications. One group works with the business as usual scenario (energy production and consumption follow the same trends as today). Another group works with a scenario based on the spread of solar energy in which consumption remains the same as today, while the third group works with a scenario in which energy consumption is considerably reduced. The three groups present findings and discuss together what would be the best scenario and route to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to avoid the 2ºC temperature increase by 2100.

Students then think of three steps/decisions to make in order to work towards this scenario. Discuss why this step and no other? What are the values underpinning this decision? Are there any dilemmas embedded in this step?

Students divide into groups. Each group imagines a family in a different socio-economic class and role-plays typical behaviour. Groups share and discuss and reflect on the causes and implications of different behaviours identified. As a final activity, the teacher invites learners to situate themselves in a situation of energy poverty and collectively reflect on their feelings and emotions. Learners then relate their own daily behaviour with one of the performances. Then, le

Divide the learners into two groups. Each group researches green economy benefits and challenges. Then the teacher organises a debate in which one group advocates for the transition towards a green economy while the other advocates for the contrary. Since groups do not have a pre-assigned position, they both should be aware of the pros and cons of a green economy and be able to understand and question the other’s arguments.

Students brainstorm ways to improve energy efficiency in their institution/home/workplace. Groups then share and critique suggestions. Whole group consider proposals and choose a few key to work towards. Identify some key steps needed to achieve these goals. Plan these steps ie who, where, when and how.

In groups, students select an environmental conflict related to energy e.g. from https://ejatlas.org. Groups then choose an artistic way to communicate or explain the chosen conflict (song, role-play, drawing…). They are asked to identify the main actors involved in the conflict as well as their main roles and positions and their potential feelings. Groups then devise a script, practise and then perform in front of each other and receive feedback.

Collectively design a semi-structured interview on energy use and energy poverty (e.g., how do you understand energy poverty? What are the main causes and implications?). Divide the class into groups. Each group locate a local expert on energy poverty from a different discipline: economics, sociology, health, etc. (the teacher can identify these experts in advanced or it can be part of the task) and conduct the interview. Groups then produce a ppt summarising the findings. Groups present ppts and learners discuss the different responses and compare and contrast. Class then discuss the benefits and challenges of multi-, inter- and transdisciplinary work.

Students brainstorm ways to improve energy efficiency in their institution/home/workplace. Groups then share and critique suggestions. Whole group consider proposals and choose a few key to work towards. Identify some key steps needed to achieve these goals.

Students divide into groups. Each group imagines a family in a different socio-economic class and role-plays typical behaviour. Groups share and discuss and reflect on the causes and implications of different behaviours identified. As a final activity, the teachers invite learners to situate themselves in a situation of energy poverty and collectively reflect on their feelings and emotions.

The teacher presents the case of the Niger Delta (http://www.ejolt.org/2013/04/crude-justice-ecocide-in-the-niger-delta/) to raise learners’ awareness of the reality of the infrastructure behind oil extraction – the pipelines, terminals, offshore rigs, the tankers that ply the oceans — and the process of how oil arrives into our lives and our tanks.

Then the teacher guides the learners through a brainstorming process to identify opportunities to improve the situation in the Niger by considering energy production and consumption in the Global North.

In groups, students research energy consumption data for their town/city and how it’s changed over the past few decades. Then research a case of local energy poverty e.g. neighbourhood, zone or group. Research actors involved e.g. people from different areas, socio-economic status, energy producers, government officials. Students take roles and interact with each other about the use and availability of energy.

Finally, students write, individually and from the perspective of the actor represented, a manifesto about their final position in the debate and a proposal for action that takes into account the complexity of the perspectives showed during the debate.